Gregory Hendren
Medium: Sculpture and Jewelry

Studio Location:
183 Lorraine Street
Studio # 3505

Email: ghendren@mindspring.com

Website:: greghendren.com

Artist Bio:
Education
Columbia University, MFA
Baylor University, BFA

Teaching Experience
Village Community School, 2006-present
Teach enrichment classes in ceramics, drawing, jewelry, sculpture to children in lower-school
The Collegiate School, 2013-present, substitute art teacher
Teacht drawing, collage, painting, sculpture and ceramics to lower and middle-school school
The Collegiate School, Artist-in-Residence, 2014
The Ethical Culture Fieldston School, taught enrichment classes, 2009-2010
Dr. Sun Yat-Sen M.S. 131 and Elders Share the Arts, 2006
Led upper-school students and elder Chinese immigrants in a collaborative story-telling and tile project

Exhibitions
Smoke Series, New York 2014
COLLABORATIONS, Brooklyn 2013
Made in Clay, Greenwich House Pottery, New York 2012
Hew Hope Art Center Summer Show, Pennsylvania 2010
North Shore Clay National, M.T. Burton Gallery, Surf City, NJ 2009
Dia De Los Muertos Benefit Art Auction; for Pure Vision Arts, New York City

Artist Statement:
Sculpture, 2017 - 2016
Operating between abstraction and figuration the works use gesture and suggested motion to convey emotion.

These colorful works are playful and spontaneous. The forms, postures, and relationships between the pieces are inspired in part by certain aspects of post-modern dance which emphasize ordinary movement and complex interaction.

Sculpture, 2016 - 2013
The pieces in this series vary from the iconic to the personal. The smaller objects are smooth, sometimes sensual and invite repeated touch. The similarly shaped objects suggest rituals.

Discovered under water or found buried in the earth they belong to a world not our own. They may seem familiar, recalling ancient sculpture or organic objects, fossils, or bone, but they are also stripped of indications of source or function.

Wearable Art, the Smoke Series
Burning organic materials in a closed container that is placed in a kiln creates swirling smoke that is absorbed into clay. Coal black, greys, whites and pinks cover the surface.

Each work is made by hand and unique. The process of firing is called saggar and the finishes are unpredictable. Several works are accented with 23-carat gold leaf to reflect light that contrasts with matte surfaces.

Unusual and unorthodox combinations of materials including horse hair, climbing rope and steel cable combine with traditional materials to create new works that reference the ancient and the modern.




All images and text copyright Gregory Hendren